(Note: For Chinese readers, the Chinese version follows below)

Like many Chinese martial arts, Zhaobao descends from a tradition of secrecy that has just begun to open up to the general public. The lineage left Zhaobao town around 1937 during the Japanese invasion. Japanese troops had made it all the way to Henan Province where Zhaobao Great Grandmaster Zheng Wuqing was a combat instructor for the Guomindang. Zheng was a martial brother of a noted warlord, Feng Yuxiang (冯玉祥) who helped him escape to Xian. In comparison to the small town of Zhaobao, Xian was gigantic. Here, Zheng taught for six decades before passing away at the age of 91, spreading Zhaobao Taijiquan to countless new advocates. Zheng’s successor, Song Yunhua, came from the opposite side of China, Shandong Province, when he was only three years old. His father was a college professor and they both trained together, making them of the same martial generation. That is somewhat unusual in Chinese martial culture where Confucian hierarchy reigns supreme; a good father is always held above a good son. Song’s father objected at first, but Zheng could see that the son had talent, so he convinced the elder Song to overlook the situation. The Song family were wealthy scholars who escaped persecution when the communists came by willingly giving up their businesses and turning over their assets. They managed to keep their mansion and Grandmaster Zheng came to live with them there.

(This is Song Yunhua (from Shandong) successor to 10th generation Zhaobao Great Grandmaster Zheng Wuqing and Grandmaster Wayne Peng’s sifu. Notice the 10-finger Linking forms for qinna half-way through the video.)

 

 

 

Like Chen, Zhaobao Taijiquan has both fast and slow rhythms. However, Peng says that the other styles tend to be more circular, while Zhaobao is more spherical. Where the other styles might move along the same plane, Zhaobao moves in a three-dimensional fashion.

As a former combat trainer for both the military and the police, Master Peng has a more extensive history of sparring than most Taijiquan masters. He was born in Xian in 1968 and boasts that the city’s proud history gives its citizens an innate love of the martial arts. He began his training at age six and studied four different Kung Fu styles: Fanziquan (翻子拳), Sanhuang Paochui (三皇炮锤), Tantui (彈腿) and Zhaobao. He began studying under Grandmaster Song in 1975 and became his disciple in 1980.

Peng always loved fighting, so by 1984 he was very active in Sanshou (free sparring 散手). Back then, Sanshou had not been adopted by the government-sponsored Chinese martial arts associations, so it fell strictly under the auspices of the Chinese military. Peng fought on a military team, as all of those early Sanshou competitions were only military back then. He captured two consecutive Sanshou titles at the National Wujing Competition (wujing means “armed police” 武警). In 1987 he won the 56K title, and the following year he won the 60K title.

After that, Peng followed his master to Hong Kong as an assistant coach. Song had chosen the scholarly road after his father and become a professor at Xian’s illustrious Northwest University (西北大学). He moved to Hong Kong for a while and taught Zhaobao there where it spread throughout Southeast Asia. In 1990, Song authored the first book on Zhaobao. Peng spent some five years following Song in that region. He travelled all around Southern China to teach and was often confronted with the attitude that Taijiquan has no fighting ability. Consequently, he was tested a lot. Peng also went to Thailand, where he decided to stay for a while longer to teach Zhaobao and study Muay Thai. Peng says that even today in Hong Kong there are four Zhaobao schools, all run by teachers that are older than him. One is by the horse track in an affluent area; the other three are converted Karate schools. Even with Hong Kong’s diverse martial arts community, Zhaobao won over a lot of converts. Peng attributes this to the power of Zhaobao qinna.

Peng always loved fighting, so by 1984 he was very active in Sanshou (free sparring 散手). Back then, Sanshou had not been adopted by the government-sponsored Chinese martial arts associations, so it fell strictly under the auspices of the Chinese military. Peng fought on a military team, as all of those early Sanshou competitions were only military back then. He captured two consecutive Sanshou titles at the National Wujing Competition (wujing means “armed police” 武警). In 1987 he won the 56K title, and the following year he won the 60K title.

After that, Peng followed his master to Hong Kong as an assistant coach. Song had chosen the scholarly road after his father and become a professor at Xian’s illustrious Northwest University (西北大学). He moved to Hong Kong for a while and taught Zhaobao there where it spread throughout Southeast Asia. In 1990, Song authored the first book on Zhaobao. Peng spent some five years following Song in that region. He travelled all around Southern China to teach and was often confronted with the attitude that Taijiquan has no fighting ability. Consequently, he was tested a lot. Peng also went to Thailand, where he decided to stay for a while longer to teach Zhaobao and study Muay Thai. Peng says that even today in Hong Kong there are four Zhaobao schools, all run by teachers that are older than him. One is by the horse track in an affluent area; the other three are converted Karate schools. Even with Hong Kong’s diverse martial arts community, Zhaobao won over a lot of converts. Peng attributes this to the power of Zhaobao qinna.

Peng asserts that there are two forms of Push Hands (tuishou 推手) in Zhaobao Taijiquan: one for health and one for combat. The health version is just for the students to learn balance and flow. The combat version is further divided into two flavors. In public, such as at tournaments, Zhaobao follows the general rules and regulations that Chen style implements for competitions. In private, Zhaobao permits a lot more qinna techniques during Push Hands, many of which aren’t allowed in competitions. Zhaobao also includes Sanshou, and Master Peng claims that Zhaobao was the first Taijiquan style to participate in that. When it comes to Taijiquan practice, Zhaobao fighters espouse the philosophy of sanheyi (three are one 三合一). The three elements are Forms (taolu 套路), Push Hands and Sanshou.

Excerpts reprinted from Kung Fu Magazine

http://www.kungfumagazine.com/magazine/a

(Master Peng has a school in Milpitas where he resides. He also has a local branch at 275 South C Street Tustin,‎ CA‎ 92780)…  (714) 656-8660 (714) 730-7853  http://www.zhaobaotaichi.com/

Be sure to check out Master Peng’s video page…Master Wayne Peng Present Forms

 The Chinese Version follows…

目前第12代赵堡大师彭羚
31.十二月2017 · 写评论 ·分类: 未分类
像许多中国的武术一样,赵宝宝从刚刚开始向公众开放的保密传统开始。 1937年左右,在日本入侵期间,这个血统离开了赵堡镇。 日本军队已经到了河南省,赵堡大校长郑武清是国民党的战斗指导员。 郑是一位着名的军阀的兄弟,帮助他逃到西安的冯玉祥(Feng Yuxiang)。 与赵堡这个小镇相比,西安是巨大的。 在这里,郑教了六十年,然后在91岁逝世,把赵堡太极拳推广到无数新的倡导者身上。 郑的继任者宋云华,刚刚从中国山东省的对面,他才三岁。 他的父亲是一名大学教授,他们都一起训练,使他们成为同一代军人。 在儒家统治至上的中国军事文化中,这是有点不寻常的; 一个好父亲永远在一个好儿子之上。 宋的父亲起初反对,但郑可以看到,儿子有天赋,所以他说服了宋老,忽略了情况。 宋氏家族是富裕的学者,当共产党人愿意放弃业务并转移资产时,他们逃脱了迫害。 他们设法保住了他们的豪宅,郑主任和他们住在一起。

(来自山东的宋云华接班人,第十代赵堡大校长郑武清,彭师傅的师傅,注意中途通过视频的十指连接形式。)

如同陈,太极拳的快节奏和慢节奏。 然而,彭说,其他风格更倾向于更圆,而赵堡更加球形。 其他风格可能在同一架飞机上移动,赵堡以三维的方式运动。

作为军事和警察的前任作战训练师,彭师傅比大多数太极拳大师有更广泛的陪练史。 他于1968年出生于西安,并自豪地宣称,这座城市的骄傲历史赋予其公民对武术的天生爱好。 他六岁开始训练,研究了四种不同的功夫风格:翻子拳,三皇炮锤,弹腿和赵堡。 他于1975年开始在宋大师学习,并于1980年成为他的弟子。

彭一直喜欢战斗,所以到1984年,他在散手方面非常活跃(散手)。 那时候,散手还没有被政府资助的中国武术协会所采用,所以严格地在中国军队的主持下。 因为所有那些早期的散打比赛都只是当时的军队而已, 他连续两次在全国吴京大赛中夺取了散打冠军(吴京的意思是“武警”)。 1987年,他赢得了56K的头衔,第二年他赢得了60K的头衔。

之后,彭先生跟随他的主人到香港担任助理教练。 宋以后,他选择了学术之路,成为西安大学西北大学的教授。 他搬到香港一段时间,在那里传播了整个东南亚地区的赵堡。 宋代在1990年撰写了第一本有关赵堡的书。 彭在那个地区跟着宋继续了五年的时间。 他走遍了华南各地教书,常常面临太极拳无战斗的态度。 因此,他被测试了很多。 彭还去了泰国,他决定再留一段时间去教书签和学习泰拳。 彭说,即使在今天,香港也有四所赵堡学校,都是由比他年长的老师来经营的。 一个是在富裕地区的马轨道上; 另外三个是空手道学校。 即使在香港多元化的武术界,赵堡也赢得了很多信徒。 彭将这归功于赵堡秦娜的力量。

彭一直喜欢战斗,所以到1984年他在散手中非常活跃(散手散手)。 那时候,散手还没有被政府资助的中国武术协会所采用,所以严格地在中国军队的主持下。 因为所有那些早期的散打比赛都只是当时的军队而已, 他连续两次在全国吴京大赛中夺取了散打冠军(吴京的意思是“武警”)。 1987年,他赢得了56K的头衔,第二年他赢得了60K的头衔。

之后,彭先生跟随他的主人到香港担任助理教练。 宋以后,他选择了学术之路,成为西安大学西北大学的教授。 他搬到香港一段时间,在那里传播了整个东南亚地区的赵堡。 宋代在1990年撰写了第一本有关赵堡的书。 彭在那个地区跟着宋继续了五年的时间。 他走遍了华南各地教书,常常面临太极拳无战斗的态度。 因此,他被测试了很多。 彭还去了泰国,他决定再留一段时间去教书签和学习泰拳。 彭说,即使在今天,香港也有四所赵堡学校,都是由比他年长的老师来经营的。 一个是在富裕地区的马轨道上; 另外三个是空手道学校。 即使在香港多元化的武术界,赵堡也赢得了很多信徒。 彭将这归功于赵堡秦娜的力量。

彭说,赵堡太极拳有两种推手形式:一种是健康的,一种是战斗的。 健康版本仅供学生学习平衡和流动。 战斗版本进一步分为两个版本。 在公开场合,比如锦标赛,赵堡遵循陈风的比赛规则。 在私下里,赵宝允许在推手中使用更多的琴纳技巧,其中许多技巧在比赛中是不允许的。 赵堡还包括散手,彭师傅声称赵堡是第一个参与太极拳的人。 谈到太极拳的实践,赵堡战士秉持三合一哲学(三合一)。 三个元素是形式(套路),推手和散手。

(彭师傅在他所居住的米尔皮塔斯(Milpitas)有一所学校,他还有一个当地的分支机构, 位于 加利福尼亚州塔斯廷市 南C街9号275号 …(714)656-8660(714)730-7853

转载自“功夫杂志”

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