“No Soi, No Ka, No Qi, No Tai Chi” – Zhaobao Master Wu Jincai

In Cantonese “Soi” means erect or vertical.  “Ka” or “Kwa” (Mandarin) is referring to the pelvic area or the area around the psoas major muscle which runs from the inner thigh, around the hip bone and attaches to the lombar column.  So, essentially what Master Wu Jincai is saying is “If you have poor posture and do not generate all movement from the pelvic area and the psoas major, then the qi cannot circulate properly, and therefore, what you are doing is simply an exercise, but it is not tai chi.

Ages ago the founders of taijiquan and various qigong styles established rules of posture. Back then, a simple direction such as “imagine a string pulling straight up from the crown of your head” was enough to get their students to keep their heads erects. But today, it is not so simple. Hundreds of years ago in China people did not slump over computers for hours at a time or stare down at their cell phones while texting or slouch in an easy chair to watch TV or walk on hard concrete or suffer from obesity. They worked in the fields, ate a healthy diet, and sat straight up in hard-backed wooden chairs.

Today, in our modern, stress-filled society, a straight, perfectly aligned posture has gone the way of transitor radios, the 8-track cartridge and the hula hoop. Chiropractic care, yoga, pilates, and massage can help to correct postural problems. If your posture is giving you a pain in the neck, I urge you to investigate one of these modalities.

After consulting with your healthcare practitioner, you can also try some of these in-home exercises…

If you are suffering from TEXT NECK, where your head and neck consistently lean forward from looking down at a computer or cellphone, try these…

Text Neck Stretches

Then follow up with these…

Neck Strengthening Exercises

Corrective Exercise Videos from YouTube.com

Corrective Exercises for Forward Head Posture and Upper Crossed Syndrome

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3 Exercises for Scapular protraction

6 Exercises For Slumping Shoulders

5 Exercise to Reverse Bad Posture

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